Course Descriptions


Biology (BIO) Courses

BIO 103 Environmental Science (3-2) 4 credits

This course investigates the interactions and relationships between humans and the Earth. It provides the scientific foundation for analyzing today's pressing environment issues and solutions for a sustainable future. Students will gain an understanding and appreciation of the impact of humans on other living organisms, water, air, soil, fossil fuels, and mineral resources. In analyzing potential solutions to these environmental issues, students will evaluate the impact of their own choices on the Earth's resources as well as the relative role of governments in setting sustainable policies. In the laboratory component of the course, students will learn scientific methodology, sampling procedures and methods used to test environmental quality. A portion of the lab will include outdoor experiences. (Also listed as CON 103)  View Course Syllabus Adobe Acrobat, PDF


BIO 110 Fundamentals of Human Anatomy and Physiology (3-0-1) 3 credits

This course provides an overview of the foundational concepts of human anatomy and physiology. Students investigate relationships between form and function. Major concepts include anatomical terminology, basic biochemistry, cells and tissues, and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic/immune, respiratory, digestive, and urinary systems. An introduction to common human disease processes is included. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all required remedial courses.  View Course Syllabus Adobe Acrobat, PDF


BIO 110L Fundamentals of Anatomy and Physiology Lab (0-2) 1 credit

This hands-on laboratory course is intended for students pursuing the A.S. Physical Education & Exercise Science program. Students will perform experiments that integrate and apply fundamental concepts learned in the lecture portion of BIO 110 Fundamentals of Anatomy and Physiology. Analyses will be done at both microscopic and macroscopic levels utilizing representative anatomical models. Sample laboratory skills that students will practice include tissue microscopy, bone and muscle identification, organ dissection, and cardiovascular and respiratory measurements. Co-requisite: BIO 110  View Course Syllabus Adobe Acrobat, PDF


BIO 115 Human Biology (3-2) 4 credits

This course approaches basic biological principles from a human perspective. It is a principles course with a laboratory designed for non-science majors. Basic cell biology, systems anatomy and physiology, evolution and human ecology are broadly discussed. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all required remedial courses. This course carries SUNY General Education Natural Sciences credit.  View Course Syllabus Adobe Acrobat, PDF


BIO 118 Contemporary Biology I (3-2) 4 credits

An introductory biology course with laboratory designed for non-science majors. Topics covered include: the scientific process, cells, biochemistry, cellular metabolism, genetics, and biotechnology. The emphasis is on application of basic biological principles to contemporary issues and problems. Students will achieve basic scientific literacy with a goal of improved critical thinking, writing, and problem-solving skills. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all required remedial courses. This course carries SUNY General Education Natural Sciences credit.  View Course Syllabus Adobe Acrobat, PDF


BIO 119 Contemporary Biology II (3-2) 4 credits

Part II of an introductory laboratory biology course with for non-science majors. Topics covered in part II include: Evolution, biodiversity, plant and animal anatomy and physiology, ecology, and environmental science. The emphasis is on application of basic biological principles to contemporary issues and problems. Students will achieve basic scientific literacy with a goal of improved critical thinking, writing, and problem-solving skills. Prerequisite: BIO 118 This course carries SUNY General Education Natural Sciences credit.  View Course Syllabus Adobe Acrobat, PDF


BIO 121 General Biology I (3-2) 4 credits

This lab-based course is intended to provide an overview of the basic principles of biology for students pursuing degrees in science or mathematics. Topics include scientific inquiry, biochemistry, cell structure and function, cell metabolism, and genetics. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all required remedial courses. This course carries SUNY General Education Natural Sciences credit.  View Course Syllabus Adobe Acrobat, PDF


BIO 122 General Biology II (3-2) 4 credits

A study of evolutionary concepts and survey of taxonomic levels of organization (domain, kingdom, phylum, class, order, family, genus, species). Emphasis will be on anatomical/physiological adaptations, life history traits and ecology of representative organisms. Prerequisite: BIO 121. This course carries SUNY General Education Natural Sciences credit.  View Course Syllabus Adobe Acrobat, PDF


BIO 125 Foundations of Life Science (3-2) 4 credits

This course is a brief overview to the unifying concepts in biology including, but not limited to molecular, cellular, metabolic, genetic, evolutionary, and whole organismal biology. This course relates the relevant concepts of living organisms to their environment. The laboratory component supports and reinforces lecture content. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all remedial courses. This course carries SUNY General Education Natural Sciences credit.  View Course Syllabus Adobe Acrobat, PDF


BIO 165 Kinesiology and Myology I (3-3) 4 credits

Lecture and laboratory course designed to acquaint students with the detailed study of the major muscles of the torso and pelvis and their function. Focus will be placed on the origin, insertion, action, innervations, and range of motion of specific muscles. This course includes the study of name, shape, and location of bones and tendons as well as their related joints. Prerequisite: BIO 171 and Corequisite: BIO 172.  View Course Syllabus Adobe Acrobat, PDF


BIO 171 Human Anatomy & Physiology I (3-2-1) 4 credits

This course provides an in depth analysis of the structure and function of the human body dealt with at the following levels of organization: chemical, biochemical, cellular, tissue, organ and organ system. Students discuss anatomical and physiological interrelationships and homeostatic mechanisms as they pertain to normal health and disease. Organ systems covered include the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous and closely related special senses. A laboratory component is included and involves analysis done at both microscopic and macroscopic levels. Students obtain hands-on experience with disarticulated bones, muscle models, and selected dissections. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all required remedial courses. This course carries SUNY General Education Natural Sciences credit.  View Course Syllabus Adobe Acrobat, PDF


BIO 172 Human Anatomy & Physiology II (3-2-1) 4 credits

This course is a continuation of BIO 171, providing an in depth analysis of the systems not covered in Human A&P I (ie. cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary, reproductive and endocrine systems, along with genetics, fluid, electrolyte and pH balance). Students further develop their explanations of anatomical and physiological interrelationships and homeostatic mechanisms as they pertain to normal health and disease. The laboratory component will reinforce skills introduced in A&P I (eg. microscopic and macroscopic levels of analysis, and mammalian dissection) while adding additional physiological experiments (eg. cardiovascular, digestive, and hematological). Prerequisites: BIO 171. This course carries SUNY General Education Natural Sciences credit.  View Course Syllabus Adobe Acrobat, PDF


BIO 210 Winter Ecological Adaptations and Field Techniques (0-0-3) 3 credits

A combination of lecture and field work will be used to gain a proficiency in the over wintering adaptations of organisms in the northeast, specifically the Finger Lakes region. Adaptations of mammals will be emphasized. Lectures will focus on identification, natural history, behavior, physiology and ecology of mammals. Laboratory will include field trips to various habitats in and around Honeoye, NY, identification of animal signs, and mark & recapture techniques to assess habitat selection of small mammals residing in the subnivean environment.  View Course Syllabus Adobe Acrobat, PDF


BIO 214 Herpetology: Natural History and Field Techniques of NY Sate Amphibians and Reptiles (3-2) 4 credits

An investigation of amphibians and reptiles of NY State, specifically the Finger Lakes Region, including, but not limited to ecology, behavior, natural histories, environmental impact and evolutionary relationships. A 5 day residential component for Amphibian and reptile identification and learning field sampling techniques will be an integral part of this course. Evaluation of students is based on 1) class participation, 2) group summary of field project, 3) critique of oral presentation of natural history of a species, 4) maintenance of a field journal, 5) identification of amphibians and reptiles of northeast. Prerequisite: BIO 122.  View Course Syllabus Adobe Acrobat, PDF


BIO 221 Principles of Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecology (3-0) 3 credits

This course is designed for second year students in Horticulture and Conservation degree programs. An introduction to the scientific study of the interactions between organisms and their environment. Students examine the influence of biotic and abiotic variables on species evolution, population dynamics, and community composition. Students are required to conduct an independent field study to integrate and reinforce ecological concepts learned throughout the degree program. Prerequisites: BIO 121 or BIO 125. (Also listed as CON 202)  View Course Syllabus Adobe Acrobat, PDF


BIO 221L Principles of Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecology Lab (0-2) 1 credit

In this hands-on laboratory-based course, students will have the opportunity to conduct studies and perform experiments that enrich their knowledge and understanding of the scientific concepts learned in the lecture portion of CON 202/BIO 221 Principles of Terrestrial/Aquatic Ecology. Laboratory exercises will include a combination of field trips and observational and experimental studies as well as in-classes exercises aimed at preparing students for upper level coursework in the field of ecology (e.g. reading scientific papers, presenting data, interpreting graphs). Prerequisite: ENG 101, BIO 121 and BIO 122, or BIO 125. Corequisite: BIO 221. (Also listed as CON 202L)  View Course Syllabus Adobe Acrobat, PDF


BIO 222 Introduction to Cell Biology (3-0-1) 3 credits

This course is designed to provide students with an intense study of cell structure and function. A wide range of topics will be covered and will include: biochemistry, membrane structure and function, organelle structure and function, the cell cycle and cancer, necrosis and apoptosis, cell signaling, and the cellular basis of tissue structure. Prerequisite: BIO 121.  View Course Syllabus Adobe Acrobat, PDF


BIO 223 Pathophysiology (3-0) 3 credits

This course is designed for students who wish to apply their knowledge of physiology to disease states occurring across the lifespan. The course will consist of a review of the normal functioning of selected body systems, and then analysis of pathological function during disease of those systems and standard treatment for these pathological conditions. Prerequisite: BIO 172 (Also listed as NUR 223)  View Course Syllabus Adobe Acrobat, PDF


BIO 224 Dendrology and Field Botany (2-0-2) 3 credits

Field study, identification and natural history of non-woody and woody plant species and the communities to which they belong. Uses of forest trees by humans and wildlife is emphasized. (Also listed as CON 224)  View Course Syllabus Adobe Acrobat, PDF


BIO 230 Microbiology (3-3) 4 credits

The course is designed to give the student a broad understanding of microbiology covering areas of microbial structure and function, growth, metabolism, genetics, control of microorganisms, principles of immunology, diseases of man and selected aspects of applied microbiology. The laboratory will give the student an appreciation of the problems and methods involved with culturing and identification of microorganisms. Prerequisite: BIO 121 & 122, or BIO 171 & 172.  View Course Syllabus Adobe Acrobat, PDF


BIO 240 Principles of Genetics (3-0) 3 credits

A course designed to introduce the student to the aspects of modern genetics. Topics will include: gene structure and function, Mendelian genetics, gene expression, recombinant DNA technology, population genetics with attention given to human aspects and applications. Prerequisite: BIO 121 or BIO 171; Corequisite: BIO 241.  View Course Syllabus Adobe Acrobat, PDF


BIO 241 Laboratory in Genetics (0-3) 1 credit

A laboratory offering to compliment BIO 240. This course provides a variety of laboratory experiences including classical, morphological, and molecular genetics. Corequisite: BIO 240.  View Course Syllabus Adobe Acrobat, PDF


BIO 246 Limnology (3-2) 4 credits

An introduction to the scientific study of inland waters, limnology concerns itself with all the factors that affect living populations within those waters. Through lecture and field experiences, the student will become familiar with physical and chemical processes in water, especially those that have a direct effect on biological organisms. Standard methods and highly technical instrumentation will be used on board the college’s educational vessel. A survey of life forms and identification skills will be emphasized as well as aquatic community structure and interactions. (Also listed as CON 246)  View Course Syllabus Adobe Acrobat, PDF


BIO 251 Plant Structure and Function (3-3) 4 credits

This course is an integrated approach to the study of plant anatomy and physiology dealing with both the total plant and its constituent parts. Emphasis is on plant growth, development and regulatory mechanisms. The student will follow the growth of a plant from germination to maturity, examining its anatomical and physiological development. Prerequisite: BIO 121 or BIO 125.  View Course Syllabus Adobe Acrobat, PDF


BIO 265 Kinesiology and Myology II (3-3) 4 credits

This is a lecture and laboratory course designed to acquaint students with a detailed study of the major muscles of the upper torso and extremities of the body and their functions, including a brief review of the muscles of the lower extremity covered in Kinesiology and Myology I. Focus will be placed on the origin, insertion, action, innervation, and range of motion of specific muscles. This course includes the study of the name, shape, and location of bones and tendons, as well as their related joints. Prerequisite: BIO 165 with a grade of 'C' or better.  View Course Syllabus Adobe Acrobat, PDF


BIO 283 Biotechnology Module 3- Electrophoresis (0-1.5) 1 credit

A laboratory module introducing the student to polyacrylamide and agarose gel electrophoresis. Seven weekly laboratory exercises (3 hours each). Prerequisite: BIO 121.  View Course Syllabus Adobe Acrobat, PDF


BIO 286 Cell and Tissue Culture Techniques (0.5-1) 1 credit

A laboratory module introducing students to the basic techniques used in culturing tissues and cells. An emphasis will be placed on mammalian systems. Topics covered include sterile and aseptic technique, media preparation, cell count and viability cryopreservation, subculturing, and research applications using cell cultures. (3 hours each). Prerequisite: BIO 121.  View Course Syllabus Adobe Acrobat, PDF


BIO 287 Introduction to Biomanufacturing I (1-1/2) 1 credit

Students in the Introduction to Biomanufacturing I course will learn how a biopharmaceutical makes its way from “bench to bottle.” Upstream and downstream manufacturing processes will be introduced through a combination of lecture and laboratory (hands-on) activities. Students will be introduced to regulatory affairs and will follow proper documentation procedures as outlined in the Good Laboratory and Good Manufacturing Practices (Food and Drug Administration). Prerequisites: BIO 121, BIO 122.  View Course Syllabus Adobe Acrobat, PDF


BIO 288 Introduction to Biomanufacturing II (1-1/2) 1 credit

Introduction to Biomanufacturing II is a continuation of Introduction to Biomanufacturing I. While part I introduced students to the process of bringing a biopharmaceutical from “bench to bottle,” this course focuses on the many functional areas specific to a biomanufacturing operation. Through a combination of lecture and laboratory (hands-on) activities, students will be introduced to the roles of these functional areas in the manufacturing process. Included in this exploration are the roles of technicians working in Environmental Health and Safety, Quality Control, Quality Assurance, and Validation. In addition, students will be exposed to basic analytical tools used in a manufacturing environment (RCA and FMEA). Students will continue the application of regulatory affairs introduced in part I of the course, and will follow proper documentation procedures as outlined in the Good Laboratory and Good Manufacturing Practices (Food and Drug Administration). Prerequisite: BIO 121, BIO 122, BIO 287.  View Course Syllabus Adobe Acrobat, PDF


BIO 291 Research Methods in Biology (2-4) 3 credits

Under supervision of biology faculty mentors, students will select a research project, write a literature review and research proposal, conduct preliminary experiments, and write a research report. Research methods and experimental design will be emphasized, including the location and study of articles from the professional literature. The undergraduate research projects will help students develop valuable research skills, and it will provide students with an opportunity to apply scientific knowledge in the context of “real world” problems. Participation will also open up opportunities for students to take part in analyzing data and conducting field research. One 2-hour lecture period, and 4 hours of laboratory work per week. Students must also schedule time for consultation with the supervising faculty member. Prerequisites: BIO 121, 122, and permission of the instructor.  View Course Syllabus Adobe Acrobat, PDF