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HIS 100 Shaping of Western Society I (3-0) 3 hrs.

This course, the first half of the history of western civilization sequence, explores the social, political, intellectual and cultural origins of the western tradition in Europe. Using a variety of sources (primary and secondary) and spanning the two millennia from Classical Greece (5th c B.C.) and the eras of Alexander the Great and the Roman Empire, through the Christian Middle Ages to the Italian Renaissance and the Age of Overseas Exploration (16th - 17th c.), this course traces the development of peculiarly western attitudes, values and institutions in Europe, and the notions of reason, individual rights, humanism, rule of law, and political liberty, that underpin them. This course also examines the manifold points of contact between the west and the wider world. (Also listed as HUM 100) This course carries SUNY General Education credit. B View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


HIS 101 Shaping of Western Society II (3-0) 3 hrs.

This course, the second half of the history of western civilization sequence, continues the exploration of the social, political, intellectual and cultural development of the western tradition, from 1700 to the present. Using a variety of sources (primary and secondary) and encompassing a range of topics from the Scientific Revolution through the post Cold War era, this course examines the flowering of the rational, scientific and democratic western outlook in the modern era, and the various challenges posed by revolution, industrialization, totalitarianism, world war and the nuclear age. Topics include, the Enlightenment, French Revolution, Napoleon, Industrial Revolution, Age of Imperialism, World War I, Russian Revolution, Hitler and Nazism, World War II, the Holocaust, and the Cold War. (Also listed as HUM 101) This course carries SUNY General Education credit. B View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


HIS 105 Regional History of the Finger Lakes (3-0) 3 hrs.

This course explores the economic, political, social and cultural history of the Finger Lakes region, from its early Native American origins to the present, focusing on the unique development of this part of New York State within the larger context of United States history. Using an interdisciplinary and multimedia approach, the course will cover such topics as the sources and methods of local/regional history, native-European contacts in the 17th and 18th centuries, the regional impact of the American Revolution, the War of 1812, the Civil War and the Industrial Revolution, and more recent developments in the areas of transportation, business, viticulture, education and tourism. S View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


HIS 110 United States History I (3-0) 3 hrs.

This course begins the exploration of the social, political, intellectual and cultural development of America from 1500 to 1877, covering such topics as the first European settlements, the American Revolution, Age of Jefferson, Westward Expansion, Slavery and the Old South, the Civil War and Reconstruction. This course carries SUNY General Education credit. B View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


HIS 111 United States History II (3-0) 3 hrs.

This course, the second half of the history of the United States sequence, continues the exploration of the social, political, intellectual and cultural development of America from 1865 to the present, covering such topics as industrialization, the Progressive era, the Great Depression and the New Deal, World War II and America's rise as a world power, the Cold War, Vietnam, the Civil Rights movement, Watergate, the Reagan presidency and the post-9/11 War on Terror. This course carries SUNY General Education credit. B View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


HIS 122 Modern World History (3-0) 3 hrs.

A survey of modern history since 1500, from a truly global perspective. This course charts the rise of the West to a position of political, technological and industrial dominance in the modern era, but the principal focus will be upon major historical developments elsewhere: Africa, the Middle East, India, Latin America and East Asia. Considerable emphasis will be placed upon frequent intersections between the western and non-western worlds during the Age of Imperialism, World Wars I and II, the Cold War and post-1945 decolonization. B View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


HIS 206 North American Indian History and Cultures (3-0) 3 hrs.

This course introduces student to the historical and cultural experiences of the various indigenous populations of North American. Additionally, special emphasis will be given to a number of specific indigenous groups within the 10 cultural regions of North America as we examine this topic from a compassionate yet unromanticized historiographical and cultural perspective. In short, we will work from the premise that Native Americans were active participants in producing that past, both before and after the European contact as opposed to being solely victims of oppression; we do this in order to gain a greater appreciation for their rich and diverse history and cultural status today. Through the lens of anthropology and history, this course will discuss and examine the various native cultures of North America to include: their origins and cultural development through time; the underlying similarities and the wide range of variability within these native societies; the impact of European cultural systems on these groups, and finally, we examine Native American societies as they are today. Prerequisite: ANT 110 or ANT 111 or HIS 110 or HIS 111. (Also listed as ANT 206) B View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


HIS 261 War and Society in the Age of Total War: WWI and WWII (3-0) 3 hrs.

This course focuses on the age of total war, 1900-1945, from the outbreak of history’s first modern, industrial struggle (WWI), through the even costlier Second World War and the birth of the atomic age. Of particular interest will be the crucial interaction between war and society: how societies give form and substance to modern conflict and how wars, in turn, spark dramatic social, political and economic change. Prerequisite: HIS 101 or HIS 111 or HIS 122 or POL 130. B View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


HIS 262 The Cold War: To the Brink of Armageddon (3-0) 3 hrs.

An examination and analysis of the causes, conduct, and impact of the U.S.-Soviet struggle for global supremacy between 1945 and 1991, popularly termed the “Cold War.” Particular emphasis will be focused on the "Forgotten War" in Korea (1950-53); the Cuban Missile Crisis (when the world tottered on the brink of nuclear holocaust), and the Vietnam War, the longest and most divisive conflict in American history. Prerequisites (any one of the following): HIS 101, HIS 111, HIS 122, HIS 261, HIS 269 or POL 130. B View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


HIS 265 The Black Death and Beyond: How Disease Has Changed History (3-0) 3 hrs.

This course investigates the manifold ways in which disease has shaped western history from antiquity to the 21st century, and how human civilization, in turn, has influenced the development of disease. From the 5th century B.C. “Plague of Athens,” through the medieval Black Death and the ‘Spanish Flu’ pandemic of 1918, disease has transformed societies and economies, contributed to the rise and fall of world empires and altered the course of military campaigns. At the same time, human activities (growing population, urbanization, imperialism, medical intervention, and environmental change) have exerted a profound effect on the development and transmission of new diseases. While historical scourges like plague, leprosy, cholera and scurvy have been largely conquered in the modern period, new maladies like SARS, Ebola, Avian Flu and HIV-AIDS, and the prospect of bio-terrorism pose serious threats to the 21st century world. Prerequisites (any one of the following): HIS 100, HIS 101. HIS 110, HIS 111, HIS 122, BIO 110, BIO 115, BIO 118, BIO 121, BIO 171, BIO 230. B View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


HIS 269 The United States History since 1945 (3-0) 3 hrs.

This course focuses on “America’s Century,” from its victorious participation in the Second World War, through its rise to global political, military, economic and cultural preeminence during the Cold War, to the present. Using a variety of media and striking a judicious balance between foreign policy and domestic developments, this course covers the events, personalities and issues that have shaped Modern America. Major topics include, WWII, birth of the atomic age, McCarthyism, the mass consumer society of the 1950s, Cold War crises in Berlin, Cuba, Korea and Vietnam, LBJ’s “Great Society,” civil rights movement, Nixon and Watergate, the space race, Ford-Carter Years, Reagan Revolution, Clinton’s Middle Way, America after 9/11 and the Obama presidency. Prerequisites: HIS 101 or HIS 111 or HIS 122. S View Course SyllabusAdobe Acrobat, PDF


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